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break the rules
sculpandart.com.jpg
break the rules

Let’s Break The Rules (of Marketing)

If you’ve been doing the marketing thing for a while now and you are starting to get the hang of it, then it’s time to throw out the rule book.
New rules. Old rules. It doesn’t matter. It’s time to break them.
This doesn’t mean forgetting the fundamentals or the foundations of marketing – it means using what you know, to try something different.
If you want to stand out in this noisy world then you’re going to need to adapt what you know – bend the rules sometimes; break them other times.
Why you ask?
Because everyone has caught onto our marketing tricks. Our beloved audience is as learned as we are when it comes to the most used marketing tactics and frankly…they’re over it.
How do I know this?
Simple, because I’m a consumer too and every time I hand over my email address I cringe, because I can see the automated email series coming before it even starts to clog up my inbox.
Do you overflow with happiness every time you receive a “special offer” email or text from a marketer? Do you love those pop-up boxes on websites that so kindly interrupted what you were trying to read?
I know I don’t. So why do we persist with putting our customers through the same worn out marketing tactics.
Unless you’re at the cutting edge of marketing or have the good fortune of starting your own marketing trend – then the facts are, that by the time you’re on to a new tactic, so is everyone else.
Now I’m not saying automated emails and pop-up boxes or any other marketing tactic is bad. They’re not bad, especially if they’re working for you.
I am saying, if the tried and tested tactics aren’t working for you, then STOP DOING THEM.
Try something new.
Here are a few examples:
  • Try three key messages rather than sales scripts
  • Solve a problem rather than selling how good you are
  • Try snail mail instead of email for direct marketing.

Finally, offer free content such as videos, ebooks or guides without asking for an email address – give them the option. If they really love your stuff, they’ll want to subscribe and won’t just delete your emails. Go for quality over quantity when it comes to email lists and the emails themselves.

At the end of the day do what feels right for you and your target audience. Monitor what works and what doesn’t.
Filter what you initially think you want to share online or via email and focus on being indispensable to your audience and not wearing them out with tactics that have been done to death.
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